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At FLORAE, we use plant extracts that are grown primarily at local organic farms in New Zealand and Australia. Take a walk in The Garden, and find your natural way to beautiful skin.

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Acai Berry
Acai Berry

The acai (ah-sigh-EE) berry is a blueberry/grape-like fruit harvested from a type of palm tree native to the rainforests of Brazil. The berries have a rich, dark taste similar to pomegranate and have been cultivated for centuries. Acai berries and the palm tree have been incredibly important for the indigenous people of the Brazilian rainforest-providing them with both sustenance and a source of income.

Apricot
Apricot

The apricot (Prunus armeniaca) is native to Armenia and grown in many parts of the Mediterranean, China, and the United States. Apricots are stone fruits and contain one large seed or “stone” in each piece of fruit. The seeds have a high percentage of oil that can be extracted using solvent extraction or cold press methods. The resulting oil is light and used both for cooking and cosmetic use. Apricot oil possesses many properties which makes it wonderful for use in many FLORAE products.

Argan
Argan

Argan, Argania spinosa, is a native tree commonly found in the semi-desert area of south western Morocco. Argan oil is produced from the kernels of the nut, and has been favoured by Moroccans for its culinary and cosmetic uses for ages. The journey of making argan oil begins with hand-cracking the argan nut to obtain the kernels. An intensive process of grinding, pressing and filtration follows. The yield of argan oil is very limited.

Avocado
Avocado

The avocado (Persea americana) tree is native to Southern Mexico. It bears a large fruit with a single seed, also called an avocado. Trees can grow to be over 66ft tall. The fruit has been used as a food source to the native populations of Mexico for thousands of years, with the earliest evidence of avocado’s use dating back to 10,000 BC. Avocados are a great source of antioxidants carotenoids like alpha-carotene, beta carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein.

Camellia
Camellia

Camellia trees are evergreen shrubs native to China and Eastern Asian countries and were later introduced to tropical and subtropical regions such as the Philippines. There are 12 species of Camellia, yet only two species are used in skin care applications; Camellia sinensis and Camellia oleifera. The trees bear fruit that has many small chambers which house the seeds from which the oil is extracted.

Carrot
Carrot

Carrot seed oil is derived from the Daucus carota of the Apiaceae family. Typically called the “Wild Carrot”, this carrot species is grown mostly in Europe. Carrot seed oil is extracted through steam distillation from the dried seeds and stems of carrots. Rich in vitamin A and beta carotene, carrot seed oil is light and gentle with a yellow color and a woody aroma. Using carrot seed oil on your skin can greatly improve skins tone, elasticity and texture.

Caviar Lime
Caviar Lime

Caviar lime, also called finger lime is a fruit native to sub-tropical rainforests in Australia and New Zealand and have been a valuable source of food and medicine for Aboriginal Australians for thousands of years. The fruit is produced on a small shrub and contains small juice vesicles that have been likened to lime caviar. They have recently been gaining popularity and are underdevelopment as a potential new commercial crop.

Cucumber
Cucumber

The cucumber (Cucumis sativus) originated in South Asia but is now grown widely throughout the world. They have been cultivated for centuries and were reported to be grown as far back as the Roman Empire. They’re longevity has made them an important part of many national cuisines. Known for their anti-diabetic and antioxidant activity, cucumbers have a detoxifying effect on the entire body.

Grape Seed
Grape Seed

Grapes (Vitis vinifera) is a species of Vitis, native to the Meditereran region of central Europe, Southwestern Asia. Humans are known to have interacted with Vitis vinifera as far back as in the Neolithic period. For thousands of years, the fruit has been harvested for both its medicinal use and nutritional value. The flesh and skins of the grapes are eaten, processed to make wine or juice, or dried to make raisins. Grape seeds are crushed and processed to make grape seed oil.